G & T Show 272 – Technical Emmys and Weak Borg

G & T Show 272 – Technical Emmys and Weak Borg

The G & T Show - Weak Borg

The G & T Show – it’s all about story, characters, and Star Trek

G & T Show 272 – Technical Emmys and Weak Borg is now available to download. Check it out here. Nick, Terry, and Mike return for an all new episode of the G & T Show discussing all of the latest news in and around the Star Trek multiverse.This week, they examine some of the General and Television News. They also mention a new item for Unofficial Productions. The other discussion topics included the Emmys, technical awards for the art of film-making, and weak Borg.

It’s A Mad Mad Mad World

They start off the show with the usual introductions. They talk over Mike’s head once again with their references to the film It’s A Mad Mad Mad World. Eventually, they do get to this week’s Coffee Klatch.

Mike’s grandfather is out of the ER hospital. He had some computer repair business. He also saw Beauty and the Beast, which he thinks glorifies Stockholm Syndrome. Nick went to the movies as well. He went to see CHiPs. He talks about all of the children that turned out for Beauty and the Beast. Nick was pleased that the theater was half full for CHiPs. He noted that two kinds of people went to see Beauty and the Beast: kids and the people who loved the animated version as kids. Terry plans to watch the film mid-week at night.

When presented with a choice of Herbie the Love Bug and the Shaggy D.A., Terry preferred Shaggy, while Mike has always loved the Love Bug. Terry adds that the most underrated animated Disney film is The Emperor’s New Groove. They explain the premise of the film to Nick. When they talk about Escape From Witch Mountain, Mike hated the film as a child. It was too boring for him.

Terry saw Elton John this week. He played in Albuquerque. Allen had gotten them tickets. The concert was held in a cow auction center like the Cow Palace in San Francisco.  Elton closed the show with Candle in the Wind and Crocodile Rock. He opened with Funeral for a Friend.

Technical Support to the Rescue

Terry steps away and Nick and Mike help someone in the chatroom resolve an audio problem with the show. Mike shares that he’s seen a lot of films growing up, but can he remember seeing them at 6am on a Sunday morning? The short answer is a big no.

Nick wants to fool Terry into thinking that they had been having a deep Star Trek conversation when she returns. Mike offers a suggestion, but he instead asks if Nick has seen the latest episode of Tales From Ten Forward: Charlie X. He had not. Since Terry had returned, he returns to his scheme to fool her by stating his opinion that Kirk was overrated. Nick comes clean, but he had her going.

Terry also watched Avengers: Civil War for the first time this weekend. They enjoyed it. Terry thought the character of Spider-man was appropriately cast.

Nick shifts the conversation to the latest episode of Supergirl. Mike confused it with the latest episode of Flash, a musical, crossover episode with Supergirl and Legends of Tomorrow. After watching the episodes, Mike didn’t understand what he had just watched.

The only DC thing she watched this week was the new Justice League trailer, which she described as white people on a grey background. Grey is a new pet peeve for her. Mike points out that at least it wasn’t Teal and Orange.

Star Trek: Discovery

Terry moves them onto Star Trek with the cast photo released this week. The photo was taken at a birthday dinner for James Frain and features the main cast of the new series. Terry mentions some of the highlights that we know about the series and Stella the Star Trek dog as well. With previous series, we never received this kind of information before launch. Mike attributes it to the Internet. When Terry mentions that the Internet existed for DS9 and Voyager, Mike states that was baby Internet and we now live with prepubescent Internet.

Mike points out a link that mentions a lot of the stuff that we already know, but he found one tidbit of new information in it about Martin-Green’s character. Mike states that her character was to be referred to as Number One. It sparks a brief debate between Mike and Terry. She doesn’t think that fact had been established, while Mike says that it has been known for some time. Returning to the article in question, Mike points out that the character’s name has been revealed as Lieutenant Commander Rainsford.

Impending Writers’ Strike?

Nick recounts from an article he found, and it could possibly cause yet another delay for Star Trek: Discovery. Bad faith contract negotiations between the WGA and AMPTP could lead to another Hollywood writers’ strike. Mike wonders if being worked on in Canada would cause it a problem. Terry doesn’t think it would matter. There is still time for it to work out. Mike asks if production is done yet. They don’t think so. They are in the middle of it. The previous delays occurred because of they wanted to get the special effects right for the show. The last writers’ strike led to the rise of reality tv shows. Even if the production may finish up soon, the need for writers will continue until the last minute, especially for a show like Star Trek. But, they don’t know if it will apply to the new show or not.

More About Writers

Since Kurtzman produces DISC, Terry is unsure if he allowed the actors on Sleepy Hollow (another show he produced) to adlib. It spurs them to talk about Sleep Hollow briefly. Terry stopped watching it last season when the female lead left the show. Mike enjoys what they are doing now. They have moved to Washington D.C. and introduced a slew of new characters. It’s almost a different show. Mike didn’t know that Sleepy Hollow was a real place.

Nick has been rewatching Buffy. He talks about John Ritter in the show. John’s son, Jason, does some voices for one of Terry’s favorite animated series: Gravity Falls. Mike returns them to Sleepy Hollow and points out that with the location move, more people can relate to Washington D.C. rather than the small town of Sleepy Hollow. Then Nick adds that a lot of stuff happens in Port Charles where General Hospital takes place. Terry sends a shout out to Anthony Montgomery, a star of that show.

The conversation jumps around a bit more, touching on Civil War and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Nick already has his tickets for the Guardians. They love Chris Pratt. They talk about some of his appearances including his role in Parks and Recreation.

Daytime Emmys

Since they briefly mentioned General Hospital and Daytime TV, Mike points out that Nichols, Shimerman, and Whoopi Goldberg have been nominated for a Daytime Emmy. Shimerman was nominated for his daytime Emmy for his role on Amazon’s series: Red Bird. So streaming television series are being recognized. Nick and Mike both wondered how shows on streaming services divide into a primetime or daytime series. Streaming show are time agnostic. Terry thinks it’s a smart move for the Emmys and thinks that it has to do with quality or ratings.

Nick suspects that eventually the Emmys will eventually merge and they will just designate it as daytime or primetime rather than have two different award ceremonies. Terry thinks it may happen only after the demise of network television. Nick believes that another writers’ strike will kill off network television. Terry thinks it will occur once the previous generation that relies on network television passes away.

Mike points out that it’s pilot season on Amazon. Amazon releases the pilots for new shows under consideration on their platform, allowing people to view and vote for their favorites. Mike loves a new sci-fi show called Oasis and recommends everyone check it out and vote for it. Oasis is about the colonization of the first extra-solar planet. Terry has heard so many good things about the SyFy show, The Expanse; she may have to check it out.

Technical Awards and Face Off

The Technical Oscars need to air along with the regular Oscars ceremony. They want to see and celebrate the people that make the movies possible rather than all the pretty people. That would encourage kids to get interested in STEM. So many more people work behind the camera rather than in front of it.

Shows like Face Off are wonderful. They provide insight into how much work goes into creating the stuff seen on the screen. Shows like Face Off showcase craftsmanship and genius. Nick talks about an argument he had with Shanna about this year’s Best Makeup Award going to Suicide Squad instead of Star Trek Beyond. Beyond may have had more unique aliens, they were mostly background characters only seen for a brief moment or two. Whereas, Suicide Squads’ makeup enhanced each of the characters, especially Killer Croc, for the majority of the film. Harley Quinn was singled out, but Diablo, Enchantress, and Killer Croc were ignored.

Makeup artists work some of the longest hours. They have to arrive before the actors to prep the makeup, stay after to remove the make-up and clean up, and not to mention making it and the touch ups throughout the day. And, with a show like Star Trek, that’s a lot of work when deal with multiple characters. Nick names off the regular cast of aliens that appeared just on DS9.

The Academy

The public seems to feel the Academy only deals with acting. However, it is supposed to focus on the art of film-making. This includes the script writing, the technology, and everything else that goes into making a film. The Academy should recognize those who advance and push the art of filmmaking forward. However, they fail to do that. Terry also believes that that they don’t inform the public of their non-profit aspects and the grants and scholarships that they have for kids trying to get into the industry. She admits that this last year, they did spotlight briefly some of the people that received these grants and scholarship, but doesn’t believe they’ve done enough.

It’s Doug Drexler’s birthday and Terry shares a photo of Doug to the chatroom. He is an Academy Award Winner for Make-up.

James Cameron

Nick brings up James Cameron. He has also won Oscars for pushing the boundaries of filmmaking. Cameron did it with Avatar by redesigning how movies are made using 3D, and before that with Titanic and with Terminator 2 with some of the advancements he utilized in CGI. He is not afraid to push the envelope and can do so because of his work with the film Aliens.

Someone in the chat room referred to Cameron as the modern day George Lucas. However, Cameron doesn’t try to remake his previous movies by continuing to add to them. Mike admits that before Disney bought LucasFilm, he was afraid that Lucas was going to re-release the six Star Wars movies with 3D enhancements before getting around to creating the third trilogy in that franchise. They begin to speculate on it, before deciding not to give Lucas any ideas.

Alien-Looking Aliens

In Star Trek: Discovery, what is the newest and biggest technical thing that they hope to see. Nick hopes that they will use CGI well. He even makes the case for puppets and refers to the Jim Henson series Farscape.

Mike hopes to see CGI characters but also CGI integrated into make-up. He talks about Enterprise’s Shran and how the antennae were remotely controlled to give it much more realistic movements. But to do the same thing with CGI would make them much more emotive. Terry feared that they could break her emersion if they moved too much. Mike just used that as an example to illustrate that he wanted CGI effects integrated into some of the make-ups.

Terry would prefer to see non-humanoid aliens. something Horta-like. Nick jokes that he wants to see the Borg, before agreeing that he wants to see alien, aliens to the same extent that the Animated Series had been able to achieve.

Andorians

Terry clarifies her position on Andorians. She doesn’t want to be distracted from what the actor says and does by what their antennae do. Mike goes on to describe a recent episode of Face Off where they used CGI elements in their make-ups to remove the human from the alien forms. They made creatures with negative space or excessively thin limbs, or other features impossible with a human inside the make up. All of the Star Trek aliens thus far had a person at its core and they could never get away with it. With Discovery, Mike hopes that they could eliminate the underlying human elements to bring the focus on the alien. Terry wants a well acted alien without making it appear that there’s an actor there. She uses Gollum as an example.

Klingons & Romulans

The chat room brings up the Klingons have been revealed. Some people don’t like their appearances. TNG Klingons were made for the viewers at the time, whereas TOS Klingons were made for viewers at that time. Mike points out that TNG-era Klingon makeup was reinforced for people for more than two decades. This happened because new stories featuring Klingons using the same ridge-head style make-up.

TNG also redesigned the Romulans by including the brow ridge. Because they are related to Vulcans, they shouldn’t be that different than Vulcans. However Klingons should appear much more alien than Romulans and Vulcans.

Mike thinks that Discovery’s Klingons look almost insect like with the way their ridges are laid out in that they appear to be more like an exoskeleton.

New Aliens

Nick reminds everyone that asks for new aliens, that people complained about Xindi when they got a new alien race. Nick refers to his interview with Kelly Thompson with the nitpicking that fans will do. His wife gave him the A-Force trade paperbacks because of how much he enjoyed the interview with Kelly. Check out the interview on the Gettysburg’s Address website.

Terry shares her fan fiction canon that Remans are not related to Romulans. Nick agrees with it. Romulans would have conquered the Remans and used them as a slave race. Braga had said that one of the biggest issues he had writing for Voyager was canon constraints. Terry disagrees, because canon can work as a creative challenge. However, writing for Voyager, he didn’t have to adhere to a lot a canon, which made it a poor excuse. Terry points out that their biggest issue, rather, was that they didn’t seek outside stories, but arrogantly believed their writing team could do it all themselves.

Weak Borg

This leads us to this week’s main discussion topic. How could the Borg go from one of the most powerful and scariest adversaries in all of Star Trek to Voyager destroying Borg Cubes on an almost weekly basis over the course of four seasons. Weak Borg seem like a real game changer.

Mike attributes the weak Borg to one film: First Contact. Nick and Terry don’t agree that having the Queen was the cause of the weak Borg. She does see Mike’s point. He explains that when the Queen died in First Contact, she took with her how many generations of experience, knowledge, and strength that the Borg had. Hence, weak Borg. Later, when Voyager introduced the Queen, she was new to the position and didn’t have all of that experience, knowledge, and strength of her predecessor, thus creating even more weak Borg. Nick finds it a bit of a stretch, but Terry thinks that could be where they got it wrong. That somehow with the loss of their primary Queen, the collective got watered down. The Borg lost something; the new Queen didn’t measure up to the old one.

The chatroom suggested that the Borg had to be watered down because they were too powerful. In TNG, it took everything they had to take down one Borg Cube. That is what made them so scary. With Voyager, they are able to fly into the Unimatrix and destroy the entire thing in one shot. Terry regrets that Voyager had relied so much on the Borg. They could have found different ways to bring her in without making weak Borg.

Mike’s New Conspiracy Theory

Mike offers a new Borg-related conspiracy theory to explain the weak Borg. He begins by referencing the Voyager episode: Muse. In the episode, Torres and Kim crash land on a pre-warp planet. An aspiring playwright bent on stopping a war between his and a neighboring kingdoms finds Torres and nurses her back to health in exchange for help writing his own stories about the Voyager Eternals. The writer posits after listening to Torres’ stories and some information gleamed from the ship’s computer, that Seven of Nine was actually the Queen of the Borg. Mike asks, what if that hypothesis was actually true, Seven was the Queen of the Borg and the Voyager crew were too close to see it. It could explain the weak Borg problem, in that she was manipulating Voyager and the Borg to ensure that Voyager survived if only to get back to the Alpha Quadrant and infiltrate the Federation.

Terry thought that Star Trek Online’s use of the bugs from the TNG episode Conspiracy was a more believable infiltration method.

Seven of Nine

They talk about Species 8472. Terry liked how they came from Fluidic space. They could take on the Borg, but they were not completely immune to everything thrown at them. The Federation did develop a weapon against them that the Borg could not devise (more evidence of weak Borg). Species 8492 were not all powerful and had a healthy respect for the Federation to the point that they created the Terradome in order to study, learn, and eventually infiltrate the Federation.

The weak Borg phenomena began the moment they were introduced in Voyager. They could have still introduced Seven of Nine, but in a different manner. Nick and Terry collaborate and devise a possibility for introducing Seven without making weak Borg. Voyager finds a scout ship, disconnected based on the actions of the Hugh virus from TNG. Nick loves the episode Scorpion and wouldn’t have replaced it, especially because of Chakotay’s role in it.

However, from that moment on, Voyager’s encounters with the Borg were almost on equal footing with them. Weak Borg only got weaker as the series progressed. The chat room suggests that the weak Borg were made even weaker when Unimatrix Zero was introduced because it was a non-civil war between the Borg.

Braga’s Burnout

Braga couldn’t come up with anything new other than weak Borg and time travel. They couldn’t admit their own burnout. They refused to seek help by asking for stories from outside writers. It was the epitome of hubris. Nick thinks they were dedicated to it so wholeheartedly, they were blind to the problem. Instead, we got weak Borg.

Furthermore, the old school weekly grind of 26 episodes a season running from September through May hurt Voyager. With modern shows running thirteen episodes and telling one large concise story, they do not suffer from the same problem. These shows take more time and care to be produced. Some of them can have more than a year off between seasons, which helps eliminate creative burnout. Nick points to The Man In the High Castle. The second season feels just as strong as the first season.

Mike points out that it is risky though. You can lose your audience in the time between seasons. For network television, a long hiatus can kill a good show. Mike uses Heros as an example. Before the Writers’ strike the show was on a upswing, but the strike truncated a season and delayed the next one. By the time the show returned, it lost not only its momentum, but a lot of its audience. Terry thinks that explains precisely the reason why Discovery could survive and it’s because it is NOT on network television.

Streaming Vs. Network Television

People who watch streaming television shows from Netflix or Amazon understand immediately that it might be a year or more before the next season is released. Whereas people that watch network television are creatures of habit that want something they could turn on week after week without the need to continually search for something to watch. When they find a show they like, they are fairly confident they could kick back and watch it week after week for 20 weeks or more.

Discovery

With Star Trek: Discovery, CBS wants to merge streaming and network television audiences by releasing Discovery episodes weekly rather than all at once as many other streaming shows have done. It’s risky, but they want to find a medium that could take what they know and do well (weekly episodic television) and merge it with a streaming on demand audience, making each episode’s release a weekly event.

Mike points out that some shows already do that. He thinks Amazon has experimented with weekly shows, while Netflix has traditionally done the binge releases. Mike later recalls that a Netflix show that releases weekly, the British car show the Grand Tour. Hence Netflix is experimenting with the weekly release format.

Nick, meanwhile, discusses the convenience of streaming is the ability to watch the episodes on your schedule not the network’s. The closest a network comes to this is through the On-Demand feature, a part of most cable services or available on their website.

Binge vs. Weekly Releases

Nick asks whether they would prefer shows like Discovery to be released weekly or all at once for binge watching. Terry doesn’t mind waiting the week to week, but doesn’t mind the binge. What she doesn’t like is the long hiatus, one of the problems with binging. You consume the story quickly and have to wait for the next installment, whereas with weekly releases, the hiatus doesn’t seem as long since you were doled it out piecemeal.

He goes on to ask, if Discovery succeeds, would they decide to release other shows to help fill the time in the hiatus? He references the webisodes that BSG released during their hiatus when the show aired on SyFy. Terry loves the idea of supplemental content. She goes on to remind everyone that Discovery will get tie-in novels with the show, which should act as the same hiatus-filling content that the webisodes offered.

Mike chimes in with his thoughts on binge versus weekly. For him, it depends on how how the story is told. If each episode stands on its own, then he can tolerate the weekly releases. However, if series tells one large continuous story, he’d rather binge watch it — not once, but multiple times to catch anything and everything that he may have missed. Mike does prefer binging over weekly.

Buffy and Angel

Nick references his Buffy binge rewatch. Buffy was a weekly, episodic show. But, it was only through binge watching could he pick up on the easter eggs and references to earlier episodes and other minutiae sprinkled throughout the series. These were easily overlooked when viewed weekly. It has a ton of continuity. Nick attributes it to the genius of Joss Whedon that could include these references that could only be discerned when viewed multiple times.

Mike points out that video rentals and DVD box sets were available back then. Whedon may have had the foresight that people obtaining the series in these formats would appreciate the references and call backs when the episodes were viewed again. Terry admits to buying seasons of Angel on DVD because she loved the show so much.

The Big Baddie

Nick talks about Buffy and how it utilized running story threads with a big baddie while telling episodic stories featuring the monster of the week.

Terry doesn’t think that Star Trek: Discovery will have a big baddie as it will be more of a political thriller and will feature more an esoteric baddie rather than an actual one. Nick thinks that even with the political thriller, there can be the big baddie behind it. Terry doesn’t think that the Klingons will have an overarching baddie in Discovery.

Mike doesn’t agree. Every conspiracy has someone that is behind it or that is responsible for the conspiracy. If the Klingons serve as the big baddie, there will be an individual to focus on, the person to stop to bring it to an end. Terry speculates, then, that it would have to be the Chancellor or someone manipulating the Chancellor.

Mike goes on to reference the fan theory about the role the Klingons will have in Discovery. Essentially, there are rogue groups of Klingons that the Discovery will eventually pursue. Whoever leads those rogue groups will be the big baddie. Terry asks for clarification by offering if it could be a rogue house. Mike agrees that it could be a one or more rogue houses. Terry loves that idea.

Hot And Cold Warriors

Nick hopes it’s the Romulans pulling the strings of these rogue houses. Mike points out that it is a possibility. He believes during this time frame the Romulans and Klingons aligned against the Federation. Nick wants the Romulans to mean something if they are used. Mike shares some Trek history with Terry about the Klingon wars with the Federation. The 4 Years war ended a few years before this series and in TOS (a few years after this series), the Klingons are in a cold war footing with the Federation. Mike thinks that the events in Discovery put the Klingons and Federation at odds once again. Nick hopes the Romulans pull the strings trying to ignite this new war. Terry states that if the Romulans appear, that they are seen from the shadows and infrequently. Terry hopes to see them handled similarly to the Xindi Council in Enterprise.

Romulan Redux

Nick addresses the chat room and the statement that was made that they don’t want to see the Romulans reused once again. Nick argues that the Romulans are not seen nearly as much as people would believe and never receive the respect they are deserved. They are a powerful species.

Terry loved the way TNG handled the Klingons and allowed the series to explore their civilization in ways that had not been seen before. She’d like for the new series to handle the Romulans in much of the same way that TNG handled the Klingons.

Nick points out the Romulan episodes from TNG that explored the Romulan society and mindset are: Face of the Enemy and Unification. He believes that the Romulans can totally be used as a parable for North Korea or even China. Star Trek Online does explore the Romulans really well, but most Star Trek fans don’t play the game.

The character, Terry would love to see the most appear in Discovery is a Captain Diego Reyes from Vanguard during the early years of his career. She wants to see him exist and then promptly disappear, just so Vanguard could exist. Nick would love to see T’Pren. Mike would like to see someone from the Decker family in the show.

Summation

They are amazed by the discussion they had going from the weak Borg to the modern television environment. The distribution and viewing habits of television have evolved. This new style can potentially add a lot of new layers to a show like Star Trek. Terry adds that it’s a unique experiment. A lot rides on the first two episodes. They have to hit it out of the park with the pilot which will air on network television and again with the first episode distributed solely on the Internet. If the first month of the show’s release doesn’t hook the viewer and keep them subscribing to CBS All Access, then this experiment will be a failure.

They quickly discuss bad Admirals and last year’s April Fools joke that Nick along with Dayton and Kevin had pulled on them. He promises that this year there won’t be another April Fool’s Joke. To know more, search for their Spock of Ages Interview with Dayton and Kevin.

This week’s announcements begin with a message from Ross regarding the latest happenings on Live Love Play. Finally, Mike reminds everyone to keep an eye out for the latest episode of Semantic Shenanigans. It has been recorded but it hasn’t been released yet. Stay tuned. They still need questions for Ask Dayton. Send us a voice mail with your questions or comments. Be sure to like us on Facebook and share our page. We need to get our numbers up so we can continue to bring you more fun stuff. This winds down this week’s episode of the G & T Show. Join them next week for an all new episode of fun from all around the Star Trek multiverse.

LINKS

BLB Productions News

Unofficial Productions

General News

Possible Discussion Topics

Book News

Product News

Gaming News

Television News

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Michael Medeiros

Mike Medeiros is a great storyteller in his own mind. He’s been known to put words to page and sometimes, he even turns them into audio stories for himself, his friends and the occasional stranger that stumbles upon his stuff by accident. He has written, writes, and will write for Gates of Sto’vo’kor, Blood of the Neirrh, Star Trek: Starfinder, The Klingons of Long Island, Reality’s Edge, and Zygerus. Some of his stories and other writings have materialized on websites and forums for the G & T Show, Priority One, ScienceFiction.com, Star Trek Online, and even Star Trek.com. He’s written a few playable missions for Star Trek Online and has even had a couple of them spotlighted. He keeps saying he’s working on a novel, but is he really? A comic book is more likely. If only he could make money flinging ink at the screen, he’d be a happy camper.

But, wait. There’s more.

He is the co-owner of Busy Little Beaver Productions and is the producer and co-host for G & T Show and Gates of Sto’vo’kor. He’s directed voice actors, and produced and edited audio podcasts and dramas because he doesn’t have the face for video. He plays well with others and is always on the look out for the next project, the next thing, the next next. If he wasn’t working on something with a half dozen other projects waiting in the wings, somebody please check to make sure he’s still breathing.

During the day, he’s a mild-mannered computer repair man who dabbles in web design in his small, rural, Central California community. He lives with his lovingly dysfunctional family and loyal canine companion and spends most of his time in the closet concocting some hair-brained scheme or another. He’s got an unhealthy obsession with Lego video games, Klingons, and Star Trek Online that borders on the neurotic.

Despite all this, he still finds the time to write the words. Find out what he's doing here.
Follow Me

Michael Medeiros

Mike Medeiros is a great storyteller in his own mind. He’s been known to put words to page and sometimes, he even turns them into audio stories for himself, his friends and the occasional stranger that stumbles upon his stuff by accident. He has written, writes, and will write for Gates of Sto’vo’kor, Blood of the Neirrh, Star Trek: Starfinder, The Klingons of Long Island, Reality’s Edge, and Zygerus. Some of his stories and other writings have materialized on websites and forums for the G & T Show, Priority One, ScienceFiction.com, Star Trek Online, and even Star Trek.com. He’s written a few playable missions for Star Trek Online and has even had a couple of them spotlighted. He keeps saying he’s working on a novel, but is he really? A comic book is more likely. If only he could make money flinging ink at the screen, he’d be a happy camper. But, wait. There’s more. He is the co-owner of Busy Little Beaver Productions and is the producer and co-host for G & T Show and Gates of Sto’vo’kor. He’s directed voice actors, and produced and edited audio podcasts and dramas because he doesn’t have the face for video. He plays well with others and is always on the look out for the next project, the next thing, the next next. If he wasn’t working on something with a half dozen other projects waiting in the wings, somebody please check to make sure he’s still breathing. During the day, he’s a mild-mannered computer repair man who dabbles in web design in his small, rural, Central California community. He lives with his lovingly dysfunctional family and loyal canine companion and spends most of his time in the closet concocting some hair-brained scheme or another. He’s got an unhealthy obsession with Lego video games, Klingons, and Star Trek Online that borders on the neurotic. Despite all this, he still finds the time to write the words. Find out what he's doing here.

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