G & T Show Supplemental Log – Terry J. Erdmann & Paula M. Block

G & T Show Supplemental Log – Terry J. Erdmann & Paula M. Block

gntterryandpaulaG & T Show Supplemental Log – Terry J. Erdmann & Paula M. Block is now available to download. Check it out here. This week Nick and Mike sit down with Star Trek Authors Terry J. Erdmann and Paula M. Block, while Terry is out of town for work. We discuss their latest books: Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Lust’s Latinum Lost (And Found) and Star Trek Pop Up Book in addition to their other non-fiction books, including: the Deep Space Nine Companion, Star Trek: The Original Topps Trading Card Series, Star Trek: The Original Series 365, Star Trek: The Next Generation 365, Star Trek 101, and The Secrets of Star Trek: Insurrection among others. It was a fun interview and one you don’t want to miss.

After introductions, Nick admits that he received as a Christmas gift last year Star Trek: The Original Topps Trading Card Series book. Mike has finished reading recently Lust’s Latinum Lost (And Found). Mike found parallels between the book and what is currently going with the gaming industry and asks if they were commenting on the publishing industry when they wrote this book. Paula explains that they did talk about some of their own experiences in the book, but it the idea came from their editor, Margaret Clarke. They tell the story of how the story came about. Terry explains that they are often surprised by how stories evolved from what they originally envisioned.

Terry talks about how much fun it was to write for Ferengi. Paula says that it was surprisingly easy. Nick shared his love for Garak and Nog. They quickly talk about their collaborative writing process. They alternate writing chapters and start off with a detailed synopsis. Mike quickly catches them up with the Gamer Gate controversy and discusses what it was about their ebook that connected to it. Paula talks about Ferengi society. Terry explains that Steven Ira Behr was responsible for establishing the commentary. Paula says that now, the publishing industry doesn’t matter what sex their writers are, but Mike points out that it hasn’t always been the case, and uses the DS9 episode Out Beyond the Stars as an example. Industry and society has to evolve in order to keep moving forward and the gaming industry is no different. Terry adds that its not new in history and is still happening all over the world.

Nick shifts the conversation to The Secrets of Star Trek: Insurrection and connects it to the book Michael Pillar wrote that was never published. Paula clarifies the difference between the two books. She was the licensing rep for publishing at the time the book was submitted and she had read it. She wasn’t sure what the big deal with the Pillar book was about. They talk about the various Star Trek films including Insurrection. Terry explains that the studios are always worried about politics and the legalisms of their films. When he worked as a publicist he had dealt with the studios and their desire to control everything. Mike says that Insurrection is one of his favorite Trek films and Terry talks about some of his favorite films and his experiences on the set of that film. Paula talks about how this film had a little bit of everything, but the public was more interested in big explosions after First Contact.

Nick asks if they had worked with Marco Palmeri. They worked with him on the Secrets of Insurrection book. Nick asked about differences between Palmeri and Clarke. Paula explained that they both brought in new writers, but Marco liked continuing stories, while Margaret sought a balance of continuing stories and stand alone stories. Terry shares a story of a one-off story they had pitched to Marco and he declined it partially because it didn’t have a lot of leads to other stories. Mike points out that Lust’s Latinum Lost (and Found) is their first fiction release. Terry says they have written a lot of fiction but they never submitted it for publication. Paula reveals that they will be working on another story. Mike prompts for some more information and Paula reveals that it is another Quark story and its title: The Empty Sack. Mike is excited.

Nick asks about where the Topps book came from. Paula explains that most editors approach them and ask them if they would write a book about … Terry admits that they are some of the luckiest writers because the phone rings and they make them the offer. Paula reveals that the one book they did pitch was the Star Trek 101 book. She recounts the story of how that book came about. Terry talks about the reviews the book received. Nick asks if the book is being used in the course at Syracuse University. Terry says that the DS9 Companion and Star Trek: Action are being used at USC Film school.

Nick asked when they became Star Trek fans. They each recount their first exposure to Star Trek. Nick asks if they are familiar with Marc Cushman’s books. They have not and explained why. Mike shifts the conversation to their Star Trek 365 and Star Trek: The Next Generation 365 books. Terry talks about the origins of both of those books. Paula joins him in describing the process of writing each of those books. Mike wonders if there was a possibility of seeing a Deep Space Nine 365 book. They were eager to do it, but doubted it would happen because the TNG book didn’t do as well the TOS book. They talk about the book publishing industry. Nick pitches a convention book. Terry and Paula wonder if there are enough differences between conventions. Nick thinks so. Terry and Paula suggest it would make a better blog. Terry goes on to describe his career as a publicist and the several years he spent on the road traveling from convention to convention pitching Sci-Fi films for Twentieth Century Fox. Paula and Terry had met at a convention.

Since Terry had mentioned Bucakaroo Bonzai, Nick asked about what went wrong with that film. Terry recounted some of the story regarding one of the greatest science fiction movies of all time. No one had faith in the film. Before jumping into our Lipton Questions, Mike asks about Star Trek: Pop Ups, their latest book that is currently only available in the UK, and due to hit the US in September of 2015 because of a paper shortage. Paula tells us about the project. The engineer is the person’s name on the book’s cover, who has to figure out how to make the designs work, but they selected the images and wrote the short essays for each spread. They received their copy of the book this morning.

We move on to the Lipton Questions. Terry and Paula provide their answers and even tell us a story about McCoy from Star Trek V. After the Lipton questions, Terry and Paula plug their upcoming book which will cover fifty years of Star Trek Costuming. Look for it, The Empty Sack, and Star Trek Pop Up around September of next year.

Paula M. Block and Terry J. Erdmann on Amazon.com

Paul M. Block on Amazon.co.uk

Terry J. Erdmann on Amazon.co.uk

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Michael Medeiros

Mike Medeiros is a great storyteller in his own mind. He’s been known to put words to page and sometimes, he even turns them into audio stories for himself, his friends and the occasional stranger that stumbles upon his stuff by accident. He has written, writes, and will write for Gates of Sto’vo’kor, Blood of the Neirrh, Star Trek: Starfinder, The Klingons of Long Island, Reality’s Edge, and Zygerus. Some of his stories and other writings have materialized on websites and forums for the G & T Show, Priority One, ScienceFiction.com, Star Trek Online, and even Star Trek.com. He’s written a few playable missions for Star Trek Online and has even had a couple of them spotlighted. He keeps saying he’s working on a novel, but is he really? A comic book is more likely. If only he could make money flinging ink at the screen, he’d be a happy camper.

But, wait. There’s more.

He is the co-owner of Busy Little Beaver Productions and is the producer and co-host for G & T Show and Gates of Sto’vo’kor. He’s directed voice actors, and produced and edited audio podcasts and dramas because he doesn’t have the face for video. He plays well with others and is always on the look out for the next project, the next thing, the next next. If he wasn’t working on something with a half dozen other projects waiting in the wings, somebody please check to make sure he’s still breathing.

During the day, he’s a mild-mannered computer repair man who dabbles in web design in his small, rural, Central California community. He lives with his lovingly dysfunctional family and loyal canine companion and spends most of his time in the closet concocting some hair-brained scheme or another. He’s got an unhealthy obsession with Lego video games, Klingons, and Star Trek Online that borders on the neurotic.

Despite all this, he still finds the time to write the words. Find out what he's doing here.
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Latest posts by Michael Medeiros (see all)

Michael Medeiros

Mike Medeiros is a great storyteller in his own mind. He’s been known to put words to page and sometimes, he even turns them into audio stories for himself, his friends and the occasional stranger that stumbles upon his stuff by accident. He has written, writes, and will write for Gates of Sto’vo’kor, Blood of the Neirrh, Star Trek: Starfinder, The Klingons of Long Island, Reality’s Edge, and Zygerus. Some of his stories and other writings have materialized on websites and forums for the G & T Show, Priority One, ScienceFiction.com, Star Trek Online, and even Star Trek.com. He’s written a few playable missions for Star Trek Online and has even had a couple of them spotlighted. He keeps saying he’s working on a novel, but is he really? A comic book is more likely. If only he could make money flinging ink at the screen, he’d be a happy camper. But, wait. There’s more. He is the co-owner of Busy Little Beaver Productions and is the producer and co-host for G & T Show and Gates of Sto’vo’kor. He’s directed voice actors, and produced and edited audio podcasts and dramas because he doesn’t have the face for video. He plays well with others and is always on the look out for the next project, the next thing, the next next. If he wasn’t working on something with a half dozen other projects waiting in the wings, somebody please check to make sure he’s still breathing. During the day, he’s a mild-mannered computer repair man who dabbles in web design in his small, rural, Central California community. He lives with his lovingly dysfunctional family and loyal canine companion and spends most of his time in the closet concocting some hair-brained scheme or another. He’s got an unhealthy obsession with Lego video games, Klingons, and Star Trek Online that borders on the neurotic. Despite all this, he still finds the time to write the words. Find out what he's doing here.

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